Is conversion a process or an event?

Like Louis McBride, I have often pondered this question, and I like the perspective he has cited from Joel Green’s book on Conversion in Luke-Acts. Again, this approach to the question takes as its point of departure the consequences of a particular approach to the human situation: What is the human ‘problem’ that needs to be addressed? A more helpful point of entry takes the phenomenological route of describing how conversion is conceptualized and experienced. … Continue reading

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When should we celebrate Easter?

David Demson told us a cute story, during a seminar I took with him on the theology of Karl Barth. It was Easter morning, and Demson was walking across the campus of the University of Toronto. He saw an Orthodox priest coming toward him and he recalled the practice of the Orthodox, so he thought he could give the priest pleasure on that account. As they approached one another, David Demson said “Christ is risen,” … Continue reading

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Science, Christianity, and miracles: some wisdom from Alvin Plantinga

The relationship between science and religion is much discussed these days. Are these two perspectives in conflict or complementary? Are they reconcilable or not? In our culture, where economic pressure on university level education is energizing an expansion of the physical sciences at the expense of the humanities and the social sciences, our attitude to the physical sciences becomes more important than ever. Add to this the growth of humanistic secularism in western culture and … Continue reading

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Habits of reading update

A few years ago, I wrote a post about my “habits of reading.” I revisited it today because my life has changed a bit since then, and statements I made about specific books I was reading at that time no longer are true. For that reason, I have made no such references in the update I did of that post. Once again, I welcome any comments you have to make about your own reading habits. … Continue reading

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I’m looking for golf balls which do not contain magnets for water and wood

While I followed the vacuum cleaner around this morning, I was listening to a fascinating talk by William Lane Craig about the integration of creation and evolution. (more about that on another day.) But then the battery in my mp3 player ran out – obviously it was a battery of the insufficiently evolved species. This left my fertile mind free to ponder other things, and my mind went to golf. I don’t golf much, but … Continue reading

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Does annihilationism diminish our motivation for evangelism?

This morning, I received a short letter which raised a question that comes up quite often, so I thought I’d post my response for a wider readership. The letter said: Hi Terry, I had someone say to me in regards to the Annihilationist view that, any view that undermines our desire to see the lost saved is a bad move. In other words, he’s saying that Annihilationism decreases the urgency for bringing the gospel to the … Continue reading

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A prayer for the sick

My friend, Edward Fudge, recently shared a prayer that he has developed for use with the sick. I think that it is well done, so I am happy to share it with others who may find it helpful, either as it is or as a stimulus to their own design of a liturgy for the sick. Here is how Edward describes his purpose: I wrote the following prayer for the sick to include reasons the … Continue reading

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Witherington ponders hopefully what might happen at the wailing wall when Messiah returns

In a Lenten meditation, Ben Witherington posts some interesting and hope-generating thoughts, as he reflects on his experience at the wailing wall in Jerusalem, where he observed Jews, Muslims, and Christians, all praying, as best they know how, to the God of Abraham. Witherington shares with us a poem prompted by his experience at the wall, and he cites some musings which he originally wrote in 2005. They have particular resonance now, I think, given … Continue reading

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Stage 5 of my journey to annihilationism – an update

  On July 21, 2014, I published a  blog post in which I recounted the long journey I had taken toward becoming an annihilationist. At that time, I declared myself agnostic concerning the nature of hell, although I believed that the Bible taught annihilation more clearly than any other of the alternatives. Later, I was asked to contribute my story for a chapter in A Consuming Passion. I was very happy for that opportunity because, by then, … Continue reading

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McGrath’s post-modern apologetic for Christian Theism

  I have very much enjoyed listening to Alister McGrath’s Parchman Lectures at Truett Seminary (Baylor University). His three lectures were entitled: “Why reason isn’t enough: The “Big Picture” of faith.” “Seeing things in a new way: grace and the transformation of vision.” “Wonder and Meaning: Why faith engages the imagination, not just reason.”   McGrath makes a fine case for Christian Theism, and I particularly  appreciated his doing this in post-modern style. He critiques … Continue reading

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